Category Archives: Getting In

Insight from G Rock Certified CEO Ryan Carney

Recently, I sat down with Ryan Carney, the CEO of G Rock Certified, a sustainability group based in Sausalito, California that is currently implementing a waste diversion program for Costco warehouses in Northern California. His interview is packed with insider information. See it below:

So where are you from Ryan?

San Diego, California

Okay cool, and what is your educational background?

I studied environmental studies: sustainability and social justice at San Francisco State University.

Awesome. And can you tell the audience a little bit about G Rock Certified?

Absolutely. We’re a sustainability consulting group so we work to help research, design, and facilitate broad sustainability programs for businesses, cities, and organizations.

Awesome. And how did you become a part of it?

A Friend from high school was involved with G Rock when it was first starting as the events coordinator and he knew that I had experience at the time at a non profit–I was working in art to teach sustainability and environmentalism through art and music–so I had a lot of experience working in festivals so it matched up perfectly with what G Rock was doing at the time. And so I got involved and two years later we’ve been engaged in a lot of different work.

Wow that’s great. And what projects are you working on?

Right now we’re partnering with Costco Wholesale for a waste diversion program, so we’re implementing composting and recycling throughout every Costco warehouse in Northern California, which is effectively diverting about eighty percent of what used to be sent to the landfill.

Wow that’s very impressive.

It’s large scale. We also do research and remediation of fields so we work in sustainable agriculture as well so we’re hoping to do some research projects to prove the efficacy of compost and firming compost as alternatives to synthetic fertilizers.

What is the difference between compost and virmi compost?

…Firmy is Latin for worm, so it’s essentially the castings that the worms produce after digesting compost so it infuses it with another population of beneficial microbes that work symbiotically with plants’ root systems to help bring nutrients as far as the soil quality.

So working together with both of those composts helps the soil become as best as it can be?

That’s right.

Okay. Cool. And so I assume you’ve been there for two years?

That’s right.

And how have you seen the field changing?

Dramatically. Since I’ve begun my work in environmentalism ten years ago it’s night and day. [I’ve] seen a lot of support from large corporations, from cities, from people, ordinary people, where as when it was first coming out there was a lot of skeptism as to why should we change our ways as in our relationship to the earth. And I think a lot of people have realized the importance of that.

And where do you think that came from?

That’s a good question. A lot of sources. You can point towards talking heads like Al Gore who could be called leaders of the environmental community, but I think it comes from local media–I’ve seen a  lot of news branches have reporters who are focusing just on green stories, so it helps bring a lot of attention on the local state and the state policy makers are also used in a lot of change in this scale, so it’s really hard to say how it all happened. It’s not necessarily a book that we have here in this time it’s just sort of evolved here so it’s really exciting. When I started studying environmentalism I thought I would spend the rest of my career banging my head against the wall trying to get any sort of change instigated and I’m pleasantly surprised to see how not necessarily easy it is to get these changes in effect now but how much support people are giving.

That’s fantastic. That’s fabulous. So I guess that brings me to sort of the opposite end—what is most challenging about being in the field?

It’s a good question. The way I look at it is that were instigating change. That’s what this is. And change can be frightening for a lot of people. We’re hard wired to  find a routine, find something that’s comfortable with us so helping people to develop their own intrinsic motivation, to accept, to be inspired, to find change within themselves has been the most challenging but also the most rewarding. All the answers are here as to how we can solve our environmental crises, our personal health, the answers are there—it’s just about our motivation to find it. Just like success for Success strivers–all the information is there you just need to have the will to make those changes. So the biggest challenge is to work with people, find out what connects with them, and how they can be inspired.

And so what is your typical work day like?

I don’t know what a typical work day looks like. I spend about half of my time in the field, in meetings, right now we’re focusing on Costco, the majority of our time, so we spend a lot of time working with managers, and employees, and trainings, also coordinating, collaborating with city agencies, nonprofits, for profits… so I’d say about half of my time is in the office making calls and collaborating with people via email and the other half is in the field.

And when you’re out in the field are you monitoring projects?

That’s a good question. Out in the field in the Costco warehouses right now [I’m] working to implement this diversion programs. With our research projects for sustainable agriculture its sights, it’s site management, monitoring the virmi composting, application of compost, so I’m happy to say I don’t have a typical work day. I like the change.

I don’t know if you are able to answer this but what are your future plans?

To do more of what we’re doing now. To expand the impact. Double our work, To go international–that’s always something I’ve wanted to strive for. We’ll be implementing a program in Portugal at the University of Lufthansa. To help students facilitate projects like G Rock. So G rock started with the intention of giving opportunities to students in the field of sustainability to create jobs so we like to spread that opportunity to anybody who has the will to enter this kind of field.

So what advice do you have for strivers who want to go into sustainable fields or make a field more sustainable?

Connect with what you’re most passionate about, and then bridge the gap between how that can improve the field of sustainability. And any field that you’re interested in can be applied to improve the quality of life of anybody. So anything that you want to do–whether it’s in the advertising field, which also spreads the awareness, accounting–sustainability firms need accountants, find what your passionate about, do it really well, and also look at the bigger picture of how it connects with this larger field.

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Insight from Former Fair Trade Buyer Susan Yu

Last week I had the good chance of interviewing Susan Yu, a former buyer for the respected fair trade company Ten Thousand Villages. While there, Susan traveled throughout Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, and Thailand) and Africa (Ghana, Burkino Faso, and Niger) to work with and better the lives of local artisans. Around eighteen months ago, she decided to quit and become a full time stay at home mom to her daughter Lauren. Below is a Q & A about her work, but this full version includes bonuses like how she feels having worked for Walmart.com before Ten Thousand Villages:

…What is fair trade?

In the simplest term, it’s just ethical sourcing, it’s knowing where your product comes from, who makes it, and that the people behind the product is being treated fairly.

And why did you go into that business?

You know I never grew up thinking I want to go into fair trade, its just, it kind of fell in my lap. I think it was just that constant curiosity in whatever job you have you question everyday about what interests you, and so I’ve always been in retail, I graduated from Davis in 2000, worked for Gap corporate downtown, so that was my first job out of college. So I did that for two years, I was a distribution analyst.

…And what did you love most about working for Ten Thousand Villages?

Oh there’s a lot of things. It was really my dream job I think because not only did I get to utilize all the skills I had built up to that point, analytical skills, merchandising skills, buying skills, but it allowed me to travel and see where these things are made and actually talk to the people behind the product, so that was really awesome of that job I think just working with artisans one on one. And also the people in my office, you know, the people that were there were there because they wanted to be there and not because they needed a job, you know, they really had passion for this, for fair trade, and the people that made the product are the reason they went to work every day, so it’s a different kind of world than corporate.

And how did you choose what to buy?

Well we were split up by countries so we would always bring products that were exciting from our trip and part of that is looking at what was selling in that market and what people are excited about. There’s trade shows every year and so we go out to those to see what’s popular. And then we try to think about is there anything our artisans are making that would excite our customers so it’s a little bit of both, shopping here for our U.S. market and also coming up with interesting things that our artisans have created themselves.

Wow. And how did you ensure that fair trade was being upheld?

…it’s all based on relationships because we work with I don’t know how many artisan groups but there are four buyers and I think all buyers alone had close to fifty six groups that we were close with for product development and each of these groups had other smaller groups that they would work with in other smaller villages so the basis of fair trade is really trust and relationships. A lot of these relationships have been established for twenty years and they have their own fair trade organizations that work with these to certify them as fair trade, the fair trade artisan group. So it’s different in every country how they are certified but it all started with working with them and our relationship that goes back and we also visit and interview the artisans one on one without the manager just to see how their livelihood is, if their enjoying, if their being paid a living wage, so we document all these on our trips there as well along with doing product development as well so it actually turns out to be a long trip–when you go out there you have to interview a lot of people but a lot of it is just relationship building.

… What is your most touching experience working for Ten Thousand Villages?

Hmm… I think there are several. I think what is the most touching experience was really, I think what stuck out in my mind was the women in Ghana. In my second year I went to Ghana to visit a shea butter producing village in Northern Ghana and it just amazed me how hard working these women were, and they pretty much did everything for the family… these women who were pretty much the root of the family, you know they took care of the kids, they did all the work, they did all the housework, and the men were notoriously known for taking the money and gambling–I’m not saying it was all like that but it was very common for that culture to do that and it just kind of touched me that they were superwomen in a different setting and type of world that we are. And I think that was amazing and really touching to see that they can run a family, run a household, make the money, and still be happy at the end of the day. They were very happy, very joyful people… And it wasn’t just Ghana I think it was a lot of places I just realized how strong women were across all kinds of countries that I visited, especially being a mom now I really appreciate the fact that raising a child is a full time job in itself.

And is Lauren the reason that you left Ten Thousand Villages

It is. It was a tough decision for me but I know it was the right one. My family lives in California and that job was in Pennsylvania and so it was really important to be here and raise her close to family.

…And what is it like being a stay at home mom after working so  extensively?

Wow. What’s the difference or what’s it like being a mom after working for so long? In terms of energy level and everything I think a full time mom is actually a lot more work. But you know the cliché is that it’s rewarding and it is. You know everything you give to them you see it come back to you and it’s amazing just to watch her grow and I know that this time–from the time she grows up until school–is so limited, and I just really appreciate my time with her. But the difference–I think both are work. I think it’s a hard adjustment at first–you know not going into work or having adult interaction on a daily basis so I think in terms of the mental exercises it’s different, it’s a different kind of stress and stuff but yeah I really enjoy it, but I do want to go back eventually.

What are your future plans with work?

If I could go back to Ten Thousand Villages I would, but they’re based in Pennsylvania so  I don’t think there’s a possibility of working for them, but I definitely want to stay within the fair trade industry, if not career wise then at least volunteering. But I think what’s a priority in the next few years is family, raising her, so I’d like to find something that can fit within my schedule with her. I might start my own fair trade organization or company out here—which is something I have been toying around with, or I might go back and work full time around here with an organization that is involved in fair trade.

That sounds exciting. So last question: what advice do you have for strivers of fair trade businesses?

For strivers of fair trade businesses, for people who are just starting out in a career, I would say learn as much as you can. There’s really great organizations in the Bay Area that you can get involved with. There’s TransFair, that’s in Oakland. I know there’s other ones in the Bay Area–I think one’s called Global Action through Fashion… but its fair trade eco clothing so there’s things like that that you can get involved with, interviewing people… and just talk to people and go to these events and learn more about it. There’s a lot of internet resources that you can read up on and go visit a country, if you have the resources, go visit these countries and try to seek out the artisans who make these wonderful products and learn about their life and you’ll probably learn more than just from reading–that personal experience.

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Four Lessons for an Effective Business Card

Even when you are a student and/or are looking for a job, it is critical to carry a business card because you must be prepared for all encounters. Here are four tips for creating an effective one even when your path may be a bit murky:

  1. Limit your strives to three in one to two words each. If you are not yet sure which pathway is your primary, consider alphabetically ordering them. For example: “Interior Designer, Journalist, Marketer.” The key here is for you to present yourself in a clear, organized, and concise fashion.
  2. Include as much contact information as possible. Email is so common these days—and should absolutely be on your card, but nothing replaces verbal conversation, so your number(s) should be on there also. If you do not have an office or postal box, then do not worry about an address.
  3. Consider including your picture. Particularly if you are really into networking then you probably meet many people; chances are that the person you are handing your card to does also. Make them remember you even more by being able to see you long after your meeting.
  4. Stay practical. Some people use shiny paper and have a mosaic or other details on the back of their card, but that is costlier and can prevent you from having a clean writing space. So be sure your card is in line with your pocketbook and style.

Ready to make your cards? You can do so for free if you have a program like Microsoft Word or software like Business Card Factory Deluxe (although you still must pay for printing and paper like from Avery). Websites such as Vistaprint and FedEx are also great resources.

Want more? Check out this post or this article.

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Filed under Advice, Business Cards, Getting In, Goals, Insider Insight, Life Coaching, Opportunity, Positioning, Rerouting, Rising, Success, Vertical, Working Hard

Career Services in San Francisco

With unemployment rates at the highest they have been since the records started being kept, choosing and finding a career that best suits you tends to demand much more effort and resources. Here is a map that lists some places in San Francisco that can help strivers stay ahead of the curve:

Want more? Check out Marie Claire’s Career & Money Blog, Penelope Trunk’s “Four Tips For Being Your Own Career Coach,” and this nationwide service list.

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Filed under Career Services, Getting In, Life Coaching, Map, MyMap, Opportunity, Overcoming, Positioning, Rerouting, Rising, Staying In, Success, Vertical, work, Working Hard

Five Must Read Job-Related Pieces

While I am flattered you are reading this—and I urge you to stay ahead by continuing to do so, please also explore other posts from other places. With job talk in such high supply, I am compiling five of my favorite pieces on the subject. See them below:

  • These tips target teen job hunters, but Schwartz Communications outdoes itself to benefit any job seeker. Some of my favorite advice is work in areas similar to your favorite classes—but this can be applied to activities too, and utilize your network. Discover more recommendations here.
  • Starting a business can be full of complexities, but Under30CEO has compiled ten steps to make the process much simpler. Reduce the stress of working towards your dream by reading their insightful guide here.
  • The blogosphere provides many interviews with insightful people, but Jun Loayza’s with Gail Cayetano, the founder of the PR firm Starfish Events, is worthwhile because it sheds light into the workings of successful entrepreneurship—and it does so through both video and a text recap. Check it out here.
  • This Ms. Career Girl post spurred from one of Sherry Argov’s books targets women, but nevertheless reminds everyone of the importance in developing healthy habits AND exercising them consistently. Read on here.
  • Once you land a job, you likely want to maintain it—such as by meshing well with colleagues. Of course, to do so you probably will steer clear from gossip, but Emily Bennington shares nine more points for avoiding becoming a “nuisance.” Stay in by clicking here.

Have more referrals for great tips, posts, articles, studies, or anything else regarding jobs? Please share them below.



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Exclusive Audio Featuring Physician Michael Rokeach

Yesterday I caught up with Dr. Michael Rokeach at California Pacific Medical Center where he works as an emergency room doctor, director of medical transport, and chief of staff–when he is not busy being president of the San Francisco Medical Society. After following him on urgent care rounds—where one patient even granted exclusive access into his treatment, Dr. Rokeach was nice enough to spare a few minutes for an interview. Included in it is how he came to be a doctor and advice for strivers.

Enjoy!

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Exclusive Audio Featuring Leader Jim Fraser

As promised, I am now posting the audio of experience and insight from leader Jim Fraser, a former president of Levi Strauss and Company, a top 25 realtor, and a councilman. His advice for young strivers is at 3:58, but the entire interview is filled with experience and insight. At under five minutes long, you have so little time to lose from listening and SO much to gain. Plus, this is my first dab into audio editing so feedback is extra appreciated. And if you do feel inspired by Jim, be sure to leave a comment–thank you’s to him  for his time and generosity with his expertise are especially welcome.

Enjoy!

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Filed under Advice, Audio, Energy, Getting In, Giver, Insider Insight, Interview, Overcoming, Positioning, Rerouting, Success, Working Hard